Using a WonderMill to Make Gluten-Free Flours

Using a WonderMill to Make Freshly-Ground Gluten Free Flours

Guest Post by Erin of The Humbled Homemaker

A little over a year and a half ago, we discovered that my oldest daughter is highly sensitive to gluten. Not long after, my second started exhibiting similar symptoms, so we took her off gluten as well.

And when baby number three–now 5 months old–started having digestion trouble as well, I dropped gluten, making everyone in my family but my husband 100% gluten-free.

I spent the first year or so of our gluten-free journey relying heavily on pre-mixed gluten-free flours from such brands as Bob’s Red Mill.

Now, there is nothing wrong with these mixes. They are quite convenient, but it still bothered me a little that I wasn’t truly cooking from scratch or learning how to work with gluten-free flours.

Making Rice Flour

Joining the Grain Mill Wagon Challenge changed all that.

Now, I can purchase gluten-free grains and grind my own flour. Not only has this saved my family lots of money since the pre-mixed varieties are so pricey, but it’s forced me to test out new recipes and take over control of what goes on in my kitchen.

Some of the grains I’ve ground into flour with my WonderMill include: rice, oats, millet and garbanzo beans. The garbanzo beans were a challenge at first, but the customer service at WonderMill is amazing, and they sent me this video that helped me realize I was forcing too many beans into the mill too quickly, which causes it to jam up.

At first I thought I had broken the mill, but not so! I was able to unclog it with a few hard taps to the bottom and get back to making all of these wonderful, affordable gluten-free flours once again!

I wanted to share a couple recipes for some all-purpose gluten-free flours with you today–flours you can easily whip up in your WonderMill!

WonderMill rice flour making

High Protein Bean Flour Blend

  • 1 1/4 cups freshly-ground garbanzo bean flour
  • 1 cup arrowroot, corn or potato starch
  • 1 cup freshly-ground tapioca flour
  • 1 cup freshly-ground white or brown rice flour

High Fiber Flour Blend

  • 1 1/2 cup freshly-ground millet flour
  • 1 1/2 cup freshly-ground sorghum flour
  • 1 cup freshly-ground tapioca flour
  • 1 cup potato starch
  • 1 cup arrowroot powder

Easy Oat-Rice Flour Blend

  • 1 1/2 cup freshly-ground white rice flour
  • 1 1/2 cup freshly-ground oat flour (using certified gluten-free oats)
  • 1 cup freshly-ground tapioca flour
  • 1 cup potato starch
  • 1 cup arrowroot powder

What are your favorite gluten-free flours to bake with? Have you ever tried making your own gluten-free flours?

 

 

 

About The Humbled Homemaker

Erin is a Jesus-loving, cloth diapering, natural birthing, real-food eating, breastfeeding natural wife and mama to three little redheaded girls. She writes for her local newspaper, blogs about her far-from-perfect homemaking at The Humbled Homemaker and edits eBooks at Your eBook Resource.
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2 Responses to Using a WonderMill to Make Gluten-Free Flours

  1. Great post, Erin! Like your daughter, I discovered last year that gluten was really creating some major health issues and so I switched over to using blanched almond flour and coconut flour, which, as you know, can be quite expensive. I would love to branch out and try my hand at creating some GF flour blends. Appreciate you sharing your personal recipes. Lots of blessings to you, Kelly

  2. Kaely says:

    I usually use homemade oat flour or almond meal from trader joe’s, but I’ve recently discovered Pamela’s baking mix which is nice and convenient and not nearly as expensive as the others at only $3/lb. I would LOVE to make my own though!

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